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Conclusion – Feed and Medication Programs for Young Birds in Training

Over the past few days we have discussed Bob prisco’s feed and medication program for his young birds during weaning, settling & loft flying and road training. If you missed those articles you can read them by clicking the links below.

=> Weaning feed and medication program
=> Settling and loft flying feed and medication program
=> Road training feed and medication program

You guys sent me alot of questions asking why Bob uses bleach and why he medicates so much, so I asked Bob if he could give us some insight on his young bird feed and medication programs. You can read his response in blue below.

Hi Chris 

The article was written for Taiwan racing and the birds here must fly a 7 race series – 1 race every 7 days and make a minimum  speed for each race. They start with 7000 birds the first week and fly each week until only as few as 1 -50 birds are left.

We must medicate to keep the birds healthy and ready to compete each week – they race for 1 million our money so a lot is at stake.

Look at a few of the commercial breeders here in the states and see what they recommend each week ( mike g.) for medication. NO CHAMPION LOFT CAN COMPETE EACH WEEK WITHOUT MED. ANYBODY THAT TELLS YOU DIFFERENT IS NOT TELLING THE TRUTH.

Do we like to use the med’s?… no, but that is the only way you can stay competitive when you fly against 3-7000 birds each week.

Bleach or any other disinfectant is necessary in Taiwan racing.

I do not sell or make money from any of the products we use – that is what we do and our record speaks for itself- your readers or any other person can look at the information and pick and choose for themselves as what they want to do. When American fanciers import birds from other countries they also import all the problems from that country as well.

If you have any comments you would like to share please post them below.

Conclusion – Feed and Medication Programs for Young Birds in Training by Bob Prisco
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23 thoughts on “Conclusion – Feed and Medication Programs for Young Birds in Training

  1. Dear Mr. Bob,

    Excellent work you are doing for us. Thanks for your good writting. Keep going then we can read more and more articles and learn more from you.

    Best regards
    Ali Md. Sikender
    Dhaka, Bangladesh

  2. Hello Sir Chris, I have a question regarding Pigeon Inbreed so give me the best Idea or in your own opinion sir, so here the question sir Chris, what is the right procedure lock inbreeding.. im waiting ur reply . Thanks and God Bless YOu. Mabuhay po ang Pigeon Insider.

    1. HI ALLAN I BELIEVE IN INBREEDING BUT IS ONLY FOR STOCK .FATHER AND DOGTER-MOTHER AND SON AND THEN I RACE THAT BABIES AND THE BEST ONE WIL GO FOR STOCK, OTHERWISE YOU HAVE A HEL OFF A LOT STOCK THAT ISNT BEEN PROOF.

  3. I think that there is a difference in how we treat and feed old vs. young birds. The old birds have built up some immunity and dont need antibiotics on a regular basis. Speaking to some of the best fliers in the largest combine in US has convinced me that overuse of antibiotics esp. in old birds is counter productive. Of course ,where weather or loft is damp you have to act accordingly. I agree with Javier’s use of natural products in keeping birds healthy. On another note many successful flyers are getting away from high protein mixes, which includes too much peanuts, in their flying regimens

  4. Hi Chris, always a pleasure to read the articles on your site. I firmly believe that a sick bird will never win a race. Very distressing to hear that of 7000 birds only 1-50 are left after only 7 weeks. Just to mention I have successfully raced 5 month old birds 14 weeks in a row to a distance of 850km, with minimal losses’. I would like to know, the weather conditions and distances, including velocities, in which they race, so as to have a better picture before I comment any futher.What I can say now is that one must imagine all the millions of different pathogens which are in the transporter every week, a bird with a weak immune system is doomed before the race even starts. Very important would be to disinfect each returning bird, inernally as well as externally, then to boost the bird. Family of birds with high vitality make it easier for the fancier in this type of environment. Any way keep up the good work and very prosperous 2011 for all. Keep em racing! Michael (ZA)

  5. Hey, I’m one of the mob saying administering antibiotics to any species not suffering from a bacterial infection is a bad idea. Better to keep a manageable number of birds in well-ventilated, dry, sunlit environment. Vitamins, minerals, probiotics, and good clean water, grits and seed is best. Also like to toss in some greens and apple slices from time to time. Loved the Spanish peanut article too. But I want to say I salute Bob Pico for his writing and his years of experience and success. I want to give him a wish for a Merry Christmas and thank him for his contribution to one of the greatest hobbies in the history of man. I’m not a believer in bleach except as a cleaning disinfectant. One item that we have to stay ahead of, and treat seasonally is worming. This too is less of an issue if the birds are screened in, kept off the ground and out of the gutters. Anyway, blessings to all you bird guys & gals!

  6. I hope this is not a trend that is imported to the U.S. It sounds a lot like the thoroughbred racing industry where every horse must be over medicated in order to win because every other horse is being medicated. It’s a slippery slope which in the end results in illicit “medication” that now has to be regulated and tested for.

    The bigger correlation to horse racing, which I fear may happen, is that the medications ultimately will compensate for weak breading. Weak breeding ultimately results in a weaker breed that then RELIES on medication in order to compete. It’s a vicious cycle that is impossible to recover from, especially when big $$$ is driving the breeding.

    Ever wonder why most winning horses don’t race past two years old? It’s because they can’t or they would break their legs and have to be destroyed and therefore unable to stand at stud for $100,000 fee. After the champ is retired to the breeding shed, the weak bone structure in the horse that prevents it from competing past two or three years old is then genetically passed on to it’s children. Those colts and fillies are then raised, trained and raced on all kinds of drugs (legal and illegal) to compensate for their bad breeding. They have to give them drugs in order for them to last on the race circuit.

    Sound familiar?

  7. TOO MUCH MEDICATING, MAYBE THAT IS WHY THEY ARE SHORT 6,950 BIRDS @ THE FINAL RACE. I LIKE THE 2 NATURAL MIXES THAT BOB PRISCO HAS , WHICH IS TEA LEMON AND HONEY AND THE OTHER IS APPLE CIDER VINAGER ONIONS AND GARLIC I ALTERNATE EACH MIX ONCE A WEEK ALL YEAR FOR MY BREEDERS AND AND ONCE A WEEK FOR YOUNG BIRDS. TO ANSWER HOW MUCH ONIONS IN THE MIX I DICE 1/3 CUP OF ONIONS 2 GARLIC CLOVES AND A TABLE SPOON OF APPLE CIDER VINAGER IN A GALLON OF WATER. LET IT SIT FOR 2 DAYS IN THE FRIG. THEN SERVE TO THE BIRDS.

  8. The above responce say’s it all.”one million” prize money.They don’t care about the poor pigeon.They say they must medicate to keep the birds healthy??No wonder,when you strip the bird of any immunity it may have had.The poor things must be F—-D by the end of the program.They say when they import birds from other countries they get their problems?Well if they cared a bit more about their own birds welfare maybe they could breed from their own birds instead of importing birds.I guess there are F–K all left to breed from,aye.

    1. These birds are remarkably resilient, and my observation is that their natural immunities will bounce right back with rest & pro-biotics.

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