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Pigeon Buying Guide Part 4

Pigeon Buying Guide– Part Four

Pigeon Buying Guide Part 4What to Look for in a Breeder Pigeon

Knowing what characteristics to look for in a breeder pigeon is essential to successfully improving your loft’s bloodline. There are probably as many preferences among fanciers as there are fanciers. In this article we will discuss some of the characteristics that good breeder pigeons may possess.

Buying Breeders Based on Bloodline

Assuming that you are dealing with a successful and reputable fancier to begin with, a good rule of thumb is to look for the same characteristics in a breeder pigeon that the fancier does. Determine if the two of you like the same things in your breeders. If so, then make sure that the pigeon you are interested in is closely related to the fancier’s best breeders and racers. If the bird is not of his core bloodline, do not buy it.

Be aware that some fanciers will sell pigeons that they themselves have purchased and have tried with little success. Assume this to be the case if the bird is not closely related to the loft family. You really want to purchase stock from the birds that are performing well for him. So, the first question to ask yourself is, “Does this bird have the same genetic background, or pedigree, as the core birds in this loft”? Don’t get caught up in pedigree authentication papers because many fanciers simply do not have those. Look beyond that.

Evaluating Bird Performance

For some fanciers, the accomplishments of the bird itself factors in the decision to purchase. If it was a racing pigeon, how has it performed? Has it been bred for stock? If so, evaluate the breeding performance of the brothers and sisters of the bird.

Physical Characteristics to Look For

You will need to handle the bird when evaluating its physical characteristics. It is important to hold the bird properly to get the best evaluation. Handle the pigeon as gently as possible, so the bird hardly realizes it is being held. The high sensitivity of the bird causes it to tense up if it senses it is being manhandled.

Spend a few minutes just holding the bird as gently as possible. Then gently open your hands and allow the bird to simply sit in your hands. Many times the bird will not attempt to fly away. You can easily feel and judge the inner qualities of the totally relaxed pigeon.  Then, evaluate for the following:

Eyesign: Some fanciers look only to the eyesign of the bird. While I like to see a beautiful eye and there may be a strong correlation between eyesign and performance, this characteristic alone does not predict the future success of the pigeon.

Balance: Balance in a pigeon is an important factor. Look for a well, balanced, strong bird. Look not only in the bird’s body and musculature, but also in its determination. Does this bird give you the impression that it is an athlete?

Muscle: As you become more experienced in handling pigeons, you become adept at evaluating the desired characteristics in the musculature of the bird. Feel the vibrations in the muscle. Look for suppleness and a feeling of buoyancy. Gently dig your fingers into the muscle and observe for a swelling of the muscle in response.

Wing: Wing characteristics can vary from strong, abrupt or “snappy” wings to very loose wings. I have seen good performance from both. I think it becomes a matter of experience and the personal preference of each fancier.

Rear end: Look for a rear end that displays strength. You don’t want to see the tail wobbling and moving around as you handle the bird. A pigeon that has a tail set that extends straight back when you hold it will generally have a nice, strong back.

To summarize, there are several characteristics to evaluate when buying a pigeon for breeder. As a fancier, you will eventually devise your own set of standards that work best for you.

Continuing on this pigeon buying guide we will go into more detail regarding the aspect of genetics in breeding.

Read this before you buy another pigeon - Click here

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38 thoughts on “Pigeon Buying Guide Part 4

  1. Hi Chris,

    Just finished part 4 which I thought was the most interesting part, very imformative. It is interesting reading the comments as well from fanciers all over the world keep up the good work

    Regards

    Joe
    Dublin

  2. Dear Chris,

    I have read all four parts of the pigeon buying guide and found it both informative and interesting. As I explained earlier (in the forum on the state of pigeon racing in Pakistan), pigeon racing in Pakistan is a little different from that in most other countries since here the pigeon that returns last is the winner: pigeons are flown from the loft in the morning; they circle over the loft for some time and slowly disappear, flying higher and higher (in circles). Some come back early while others return late in the evening. The pigeon that returns the last is declared the winner. What I want to know is whether all the suggestions in your pigeon buying guide posts are relevant to pigeons used for racing in Pakistan as well or whether these would only be applicable to pigeons used for racing in the Western world since pigeons in Pakistan race differently (as already explained above).

  3. Dear Chris,

    I have read all four parts of the pigeon buying guide and found it both informative and interesting. As I explained earlier (in the forum on the state of pigeon racing in Pakistan), pigeon racing in Pakistan is a little different from that in most other countries since here the pigeon that returns last is the winner: pigeons are flown from the loft in the morning; they circle over the loft for some time and slowly disappear, flying higher and higher (in circles). Some come back early while others return late in the evening. The pigeon that returns the last is declared the winner. What I want to know is whether all the suggestions in you pigeon buying guide posts are relevant to pigeons used for racing in Pakistan as well or whether these would only be applicable to pigeons used for racing in the Western world since pigeons in Pakistan race differently (as already explained above).

  4. I left a comment at the end of Part 1 and wanted to cover my bases so here it is again. I’m a farmer who doesn’t have the time or energy for racing. But I really enjoy looking up in the sky and seeing birds flying and know that they are my birds.I’ve been looking for homers to buy due to the loss of my birds and have had trouble finding any for sale.I live in the southeast Mo. area and would appreciate any info regarding bird sales etc; Hope someone can help me out. Thanks, Andy B.

    1. Hello Chris,
      I’m just drawing up plans for a new loft, I’ve been out of the sport for 25 year’s,back in California my loft was 50′ ft. long. I am going to start out with a 8 foot x 8foot loft. I’ve read almost all you have on line and it has been so very valuable in designing my new loft and buying my first bird’s,ventilation, etc., etc.Thank You for all your valuable info and how all the information that you have given me alot of do’s and don’ts that I know I will make everything better for my bird’s.
      Chuck Logan
      LaVergne, TN.

      1. try the web site red rose lofts they have a great design of a small loft but can be modified to any size we have built sveral lofts here for members and the birds stay very healthy in them

  5. Hi All
    We just love your postes and all the replys to your posts.
    This is our first year after being away from the sport for more then a few years and we are of a mind set of breeding pigeons that not only win races but are ave speed birds so hope we get a few good ones out of the pigeons we breed from we will keep you posted.
    Again thanks Chris KEEP EM COMMING

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